The charm of incompleteness

We have asked to an artist, selected for Mediterranea 17 Young Artists Biennale, to tell us how she feels less than month away from the event. Here is the result.

It’s not that long ago that I came back from an annual art festival called „Schmiede“, located in the small village Hallein near Salzburg in Austria. There, in a former saline, more than 300 international artists of multiple disciplines gather together to express and shape their ideas within common projects.

Now, travelling to Milan almost feels like an expansion in time and space, entering a place where again I will meet over 300 international artists that work on different fields of artistic production.

The difference now at the Biennale is that the focus lies on the presentation rather than the development of the artwork. The arduous process of becoming with its thrilling, deliberate, insecure and enthusiastic moments is hidden from the visitors’ eye as well as the potential incompleteness of the work. Thus the encounter with other artists could look differently: more reserved, reputable, shy? Again I look forward to meet people sharing their enthusiasm for creating, people that challenge themselves to go beyond boundaries. I get excited about my senses being nourished and provoked in a way that exceed mere consumption. The confrontation with art is a pleasure that stimulates critical thinking, and enables me to update my own way of being through the impact of others. The wonderful thing about the artistic practice is that the act of rearranging previous regimes is reflected in a social level, in a manner which not least promotes a dialogue between cultures and affirms diversity.

The contingency and unsteadiness of forms and systems imply a transformational potential which can be seen as a value in addition to our understanding of preserving culture and identity. It’s how Andrea Bruciati, curator of Mediterranea 17 expresses in his concept: “An open system […]that, in its incompleteness, grow beyond himself”. I can hardly think of anything more boring, and of course impossible, than a never-changing world, where new encounters are being rejected and perceived as irrational threat.

In this sense I am glad and honoured to take part at the Young Artists Biennale and to have the opportunity to discover Milan.

 

By Maria Morschitzky,

Visual Artist selected by Austria to participate to

Mediterranea 17 Young Artists Biennale

 

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